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The fruit you’ve been dreaming of during every summer cookout is finally at area farmers tailgate markets: watermelon. Multiple melons have made their debut of the season this past week! Read the rest of this entry »

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Summer is the quintessential time for outings of all kinds. Area farmers tailgate markets are great for an in-town, close-to-home excursion: experience new foods, cultivate community, hear live music, and bring home delicious goodies direct from local farmers. Read the rest of this entry »

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The times, they are a changin’ at area farmers tailgate markets. Some summer varieties won’t be around for much longer, and you should get them while you still can. Fall produce varieties are just now arriving, and we can look forward to them in the coming weeks. Read the rest of this entry »

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Going to area farmers tailgate markets is more than just “going shopping.” The market can be an event — wonderful music, catching up with old friends, and connecting with folks that grow our food — a festive way to celebrate life, food, and our vibrant communities. Read the rest of this entry »

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Each and every week, area farmers tailgate markets have newly in-season vegetables and fruits to boast — there are almost too many to name here! What’s on the roster of just-arrived produce? Corn, okra, celery, and watermelons, to name but a few! Read the rest of this entry »

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Things are getting sweet at area farmers tailgate markets this week! Sweet corn, berries, melons, and more are sweeping vendors stalls. Read the rest of this entry »

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Sweet Corn

It’s a family affair at farmers markets these days! The Three Sisters—beans, corn, and squash—can be found now. Called sisters historically because they share a season and help each other grow and thrive, these three plants were the principal crops of Native American groups. Farmers still companion plant these crops today.

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