Comment. Share. Connect. Join ASAP in an ongoing conversation about local food FROM HERE in the Southern Appalachians.

Rainbow of summer veggies

Calling all photographers and local food enthusiasts!

ASAP produces an annual calendar showcasing the seasonality of local food and farms in our Southern Appalachian Mountains. This year, we want to feature how members of our local food community engage with Appalachian Grown™ food throughout the year. This year’s calendar theme is called “Share Your Experience,” and will feature YOUR photos of local food seasonality in our region. Twelve winning photos will be printed in our 2018 calendar, and spotlighted in social media.

Photo Contest Rules:

  1. The calendar photo contest is open to amateur and professional photographers. Photos received by November 1 will given first consideration. You may submit as many photos as you like.
  2. Please submit images to ASAPphotography@nullasapconnections.org. Please include in your email your full name and a brief description of each image. Please name each file with your full name and subject matter.
  3. Submitted photos must be in digital format. No print or film submissions will be accepted. All digital files must be at least 3500 pixels wide x 2500 pixels tall, and submitted in JPEG or .jpg format. Winning images will be printed in a 7” x 10” horizontal format calendar.
  4. With your submission ASAP is granted rights to publish your photo online and in the calendar, as well as use your photos for other local food promotions. Written permission from a parent or guardian is required for any photos containing children ages 18 or under. Any photos containing people’s faces will require written or verbal permission from subject for ASAP to use. 
  5. If your photo is selected, ASAP will notify you by December. We will give you credit in the calendar, spotlight you in social media during that month, and send you three calendars and a ticket to ASAP’s 2018 Farm Tour on June 23-24.

Image Suggestions

Images should depict your experiences with local food and agriculture in the Appalachian Grown Region.  Below is a list of image suggestions, but images are not limited to these topics. 

  • Appalachian Grown Logo
  • Farmers Markets and Tailgate Markets
  • On the Farm
  • Community Supported Agriculture
  • In the kitchen
  • On The Plate
  • Farm Experiences
  • Farm to School
  • Farmscapes (images with mountains in the background are great)
  • Food processing
  • Holidays
  • Winter
In: Connecting With ASAP, Get Local!, Giveaways and ContestsNo Comments

The summer-like weather of the past week feels quite at odds with the changing leaves and October dates. This juxtaposition of the seasons is also reflected in the produce at market: there’s winter squash, broccoli, and sweet potatoes, yet there are also still tomatoes, cucumbers, and okra to be found, as well as other delights not as emblematic of either season.

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In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments

Cruciferous vegetables, also known as brassicas, are autumnal superstars. Broccoli, cauliflower, romanesco, cabbage, kohlrabi, and other varieties are just now beginning to come into full swing. Broccoli is back and other brassica are on their way!

What’s the difference between cruciferous and brassica vegetables? There isn’t any. They’re interchangeable names for the same family of plants. Brassica is part of the Latin name for the family, and cruciferous refers to the four leaf arrangement on some plants in the family.

Broccoli (and its companion, cauliflower) are around in spring, disappear in summer, and return with fanfare in the fall. Find the first broccoli now from Aardvark Farm (Asheville City Market, River Arts District Farmers Market, and Yancey County Farmers Market) and Paper Crane Farm (West Asheville Tailgate Market and Asheville City Market). Other farms throughout the region will have broccoli, as well as cauliflower, in the coming weeks.

Napa cabbage is in its prime, now through early to mid-November. Napa cabbage is the traditional variety used for kimchi, so now is the perfect kimchi-making time of year. You can find napa cabbage from farmers throughout the region, including a purple variety from Ten Mile Farm (Asheville City Market and River Arts District Farmers Market).

October marks the beginning of market closing season. Oakley Farmers Market and East Asheville Tailgate Market both had their last markets of the season at the end of September. Check your favorite markets’ listings in ASAP’s online Local Food Guide, as well as their social media pages, to find out when their seasons end.

Each week farmers have a wide array of fruits and vegetables. In addition to produce, you can always find a range of meats, cheeses, eggs, breads, baked goods, value added items, fresh flowers, and other treats!

Area farmers tailgate markets take place throughout the region. As always, you can find information about farms, tailgate markets, and farm stands, including locations and hours, by visiting ASAP’s online Local Food Guide.

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments

The return of the root vegetables is imminent. Though some root veggies are around for most of the year — for example, potatoes last from midsummer harvests through their midwinter storage crops — other root vegetables come and go. Radishes and turnips have just begun to appear at farmers’ stands, and more (carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, etc) are on their way.

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In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments

The first sweet potatoes always arrive later than the first winter squash. Once that initial squash makes an appearance, it’s only a matter of weeks before the sweet potato does, and for fans of these tubers, those weeks are a countdown.

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In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments

ASAP likes to share stories of people who help us fulfill our mission and contribute to growing our local food movement. This month in celebration of the start of the school year, we’ve spoken with Amanda Fox, the Student Support Specialist at Emma Elementary School about using their school/community garden (maintained in collaboration with their neighbor, Emma Family Resource Center), to grow food with their students. Hear how Amanda’s students react to gardening and trying new things, and how the community uses the garden too!  Read the rest of this entry »

In: Program PostNo Comments

Winter squash is beginning to take center stage at area farmers tailgate markets, along with the cooler temperatures and crisp, fall-like weather. 

There’s already a range of squash varieties. Kabocha, Delicata, Butternut, and Acorn are all here, ready to be roasted. These squashes have so much flavor, you need not add more than butter and a sprinkle of salt. And don’t forget the seeds – all of these squashes have great seeds for roasting. Remove them from the meat of the squash, clean them, and roast at a low temperature until they’re dry and crisp. Add butter and seasoning to make a great snack!

Two particularly exciting varieties to check out are Spaghetti squash and a Honeynut squash, which look like baby Butternut squash. Ask anyone who has tried them – they’re absolutely delicious! These squash are especially sweet, making them great for dessert ingredients for pies and other fall treats. Find Spaghetti squash and Honeynut squash from Wendy Town Farms at West Asheville Tailgate Market, as well as from other farms throughout the area. 

Each week farmers have a wide array of fruits and vegetables. In addition to produce, you can always find a range of meats, cheeses, eggs, breads, baked goods, value added items, fresh flowers, and other treats!

Area farmers tailgate markets take place throughout the region. As always, you can find information about farms, tailgate markets, and farm stands, including locations and hours, by visiting ASAP’s online Local Food Guide.

 

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments

Long, hot summer days are fading into cooler evenings and the first hints of fall. That means a new crop of late-summer fruits at area tailgate farmers markets, even as you savor the last of the berries and peaches.

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In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments
Nathan Morrison of Simple Bread

Of course, there is an abundance of food at area farmers tailgate markets. But that isn’t the only cornucopia — people and a sense of community abound at markets as well. There is something fulfilling and wholesome about seeing the same faces week after week, year after year. As a visitor or newcomer, you’re sure to be welcomed with smiles, conversations, and ready answers to questions. Food certainly makes markets, but they would be nothing without the extraordinary people who grow, raise, produce, preserve, bake, and bring all that food to us.

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In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments

As it starts to feel increasingly more like late summer, preserving the flavors of summer looms larger in many minds. There are folks who are fantastic at preserving all season long — starting with jam from the first strawberries. And then there are others that do it inconsistently — some pickled beans here, some frozen peaches there. Of course, not everyone takes part; some folks prefer to buy fresh each week throughout the whole year, only eating summer’s bounty at the point it’s harvested.

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In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments