ASAP Local Food Strong Farms Healthy Communities

Comment. Share. Connect. Join ASAP in an ongoing conversation about local food FROM HERE in the Southern Appalachians.

kohlrabi

This week has felt like the apex of summer, though on the farm the season’s harvest is just moving into high gear. After one of the wettest years in recent memory, farmers are compensating for unseasonably warm temperatures and a lack of rain right now. But that hasn’t stopped new produce from making its way to farmers tailgate markets.

Read the rest of this entry »

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments
Spring onions at farmers markets

Memorial Day marks the unofficial kickoff to summer (even if by the calendar we’re still four weeks out) and, just in time, summer squash has made its first market appearances. We spotted baby zephyr, zucchini, and pattypan varieties this past week from Olivette Farm (Asheville City Market) and Full Sun Farm (North Asheville Tailgate Market, River Arts District Farmers Market), and more farms will have it soon.

Other seasonal finds picking up speed are spring alliums. Wondering about the differences between all the spring onions, scallions, leeks, green garlic, and garlic scapes filling up market tables? Here’s a quick rundown.

Read the rest of this entry »

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments
rainbow chard

Are there colors you associate with different seasons at farmers tailgate markets? The vivid reds, yellows, and purples of summer tomatoes, crookneck squash, and eggplant? The deep golds and dark greens of fall pumpkins and kale? Shades of spring—pink, yellow-orange, and emerald green—are starting perk up market tents.

Read the rest of this entry »

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments
red sorrel

More harbingers of spring showed up at markets around the region this past weekend. One such pioneer is sorrel, which Jake’s Farm at Asheville City Market-Winter has had for the past two weeks. Read the rest of this entry »

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments
spring CSA box

These can be weeks of whiplash as the temperature swings from tantalizingly warm to hard freeze. Is it time to look for seed starts, or hunker down with a hearty stew and fridge full of provisions in case of a snow day?

The slower shoulder season is a good time to ask your favorite farmers tailgate market vendors about what they might have in coming weeks. As storage crops like potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and winter squash begin to wane, you’re likely to see an uptick in greens, including salad green mixes, baby kale, microgreens, and pea shoots. Read the rest of this entry »

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments
Mother Ocean Fish at Asheville City Market

Seafood isn’t something particularly local to the mountains of Western North Carolina, but farmers markets can still be a chance to find good fish choices to enjoy alongside more locally grown fare. Asheville City Market-Winter offers a few possibilities.

Read the rest of this entry »

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments
Apples from Creasman Farms at Asheville City Market

Fruit can be hard to come by in the winter if you’re shopping locally in Western North Carolina. Apples are a rosy-hued exception, and they continue to be available from storage through most of the season. Creasman Farms (Asheville City Market-Winter, Transylvania Farmers Market) usually has ten or so varieties, ranging from the crunchy-tart Arkansas Black to the sweeter, juicier Pink Lady. Read the rest of this entry »

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments
Carolina Flowers at Asheville City Market-Winter

Can you give your loved one a locally grown Valentine’s Day bouquet, even in midst of winter? Yes, you can!

Carolina Flowers returned to Asheville City Market-Winter a few weeks ago and has anemones, hyacinths, paperwhites, and amaryllis. The farm offers vases of flowers as well as bulbs, which means your gift will last longer than a traditional cut-flower bouquet. Enduring living-plant gifts can also be procured from Finally Farm, which has an assortment of potted succulents in many sizes. Read the rest of this entry »

In: Fresh at Farmers MarketsNo Comments